MaPP Snapshot stories and photos capture some of the people, local and traditional culture, economic opportunities and rich marine life and habitat on B.C.’s North Pacific Coast. Subscribe to the MaPP newsletter to get the latest MaPP Snapshots.

MaPP selects indicators to track changes in the health of B.C.’s North Pacific Coast

The Marine Plan Partnership for the North Pacific Coast (MaPP) has picked 14 pilot regional indicators that, taken together over the long-term, will provide insights into the health of B.C.’s North Pacific Coast and help guide implementation of coastal management recommendations in MaPP sub-regional plans. Hundreds of potential ecological, economic and human well-being indicators were […]

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Many voices make for better policymaking and results

Integral to the MaPP planning process and the current implementation phase, has been the participation of many different individuals, groups and organizations connected in one way or another to the region’s rich marine environment. Otherwise known as stakeholders, this diverse mix of voices added much-valued input and authenticity to the creation of the North Vancouver […]

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At the mouth of the Skeena: A unique estuary

Originating high in the coastal mountains of northwestern British Columbia, the Skeena is the second largest river in the province and one of the world’s longest undammed waterways. It winds 610 kilometres from its headwaters to its rich estuary near Prince Rupert. The mouth of the Skeena is a world onto itself. Unlike most estuaries, […]

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Hunting down aliens: An international team tracks the spread of tunicates in Haida Gwaii waters

Slimy and brightly coloured, these aliens – otherwise known as Chain tunicate (Botrylloides violaceus) and Star tunicate (Botryllus sclosseri) – spread across docks, boats, gear and the rocky seafloor, smothering seaweeds, barnacles, shellfish and any other species in their path. Because of their ability to overgrow and spread quickly, invasive tunicates are considered a big […]

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Tracking cumulative effects

Growing up in the rolling savannah of Botswana in southern Africa, Maya Paul could never have imagined that she would one day find herself living amid the rain forests of British Columbia’s north coast. Yet that’s exactly where her expertise in strategic planning and engagement has led her. In January 2016, Maya was appointed cumulative […]

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Coastal Guardian Watchman training and ecosystem-based management indicator development

First Nations people have long understood that the use of natural resources needs to be carefully managed in order to remain sustainable. They recognize that species, ecosystems and humans cannot be considered in isolation – healthy environments and healthy communities go hand-in-hand. This has been a guiding principle in their relationship with nature for thousands […]

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Collaborative marine management underway on B.C.’s North Coast: A primer on the Regional Action Framework

The Regional Action Framework (RAF) is the result of intensive consultation and planning for marine areas along the North Pacific Coast of B.C., from Campbell River through to the Alaskan border. Its broad view prioritizes both ecosystem and human well-being, as well as collaborative and efficient marine management. With a 20-year scope, implementation of the […]

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NVI Sub-region probes shellfish aquaculture, guardian programs, and economic development

MaPP co-leads in the North Vancouver Island (NVI) Marine Plan area are carefully reviewing a trio of newly completed reports that suggest critical roles for First Nations in economic development and conservation activities. “These studies show that we’re serious about implementing this plan, and that there are economic opportunities for everyone here—even in stewardship,” says […]

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Putting diving on the MaPP map

A rock wall in the waters off the Northern tip of Vancouver Island is world famous – at least to a select group of people in dry suits. Scuba divers come from all over the world to dive the wall at Browning Pass and other remarkable sites near Port Hardy. Browning wall is a sheer […]

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Grandfather Handshake and Big Fish – Two Generations Protect a Way of Life

Chief Sm’ooygit Niist’oyx, or “Grandfather Handshake”, is a hereditary chief of the Gitwilgyoots tribe, one of the nine allied tribes of the Coast Tsimshian who live near the lower Skeena River on B.C.’s north coast. His given name is Clarence Nelson. He is a traditional and commercial fisherman, a member of many community committees and […]

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A wealth of traditional knowledge on Haida Gwaii

Marine planning in the MaPP initiative draws from different sources of information, including Western science, local knowledge and traditional knowledge. A robust source of information on the North Pacific coast – where First Nations communities have lived for thousands of years – is traditional knowledge. This has involved documenting First Nations understanding about marine habitats, […]

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Hatching a new industry on the North Coast

Canadian waters, Chilean technology, and First Nations and Chinese investment are all contributing to the success of the Coastal Shellfish Corporation in Prince Rupert. With a modern shellfish hatchery built in Prince Rupert and a shellfish farm in Metlakatla traditional territory, Coastal Shellfish hatches, grows and harvests scallops with minimal environmental impact. Originally planned as […]

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Where the forest meets the sea – harvesting logs, protecting habitat

How do First Nations, the forest industry and the provincial government work together to manage logging in the Central Coast? And, just as importantly, how do they protect the environment while they’re doing it? In response, Warren Warttig quotes a university professor: “Forestry isn’t rocket science – it’s much harder than that,” he notes. Warttig […]

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Seafood delivers a bounty to coastal communities

While eating more fish might seem like a simple, healthy dietary decision, in fact, it also offers consumers the chance to make a big difference to coastal communities in British Columbia. That’s the passionate belief of Jamie Alley, a former director with the B.C. Ministry of Environment, now retired and consulting to government, First Nations […]

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